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Forum Lockedsail cover/lazy jacks

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pete View Drop Down
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    Posted: 05 July 2005 at 3:45pm
My 45' steel ketch project has finally gotten to the point of making sail covers. Does anyone have experience with/opinions about the type of mainsail cover that one sees on some newer boats(especially catamarans) where the bottom of the cover is attached to the top of the boom and the top is attached to lazyjacks. The cover stays on the boom all the time. Seems mighty convenient. Any drawbacks? By the way, how do they deal with the foward part of the sail where it's bunched up higher against the mast due to the slides? These covers allways appear to angle up on a straight line from aft to foward, without a hump for the high foward part of the sail. Any help greatly appreciated.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bob_mullen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2005 at 6:45pm
I'm currently constructing a "stack pack" type cover.  I didn't want to put bolt rope channels on the boom so I made the two sides and used snaps to connect them under the main (this only works if you have slides on the boom).  I still haven't worked out how to finish the front.  Right now it's open, connected with ties through loops I sewed on the leading edge.  I know I'll change this because it isn't a very good solution.  I bought a RIRI zipper 15' long for the 16' boom, figureing I'd leave the last foot uncovered since it only has the reefing lines and topping lift.  So here's a tip, buy a zipper longer than you need... now the last 18" of sail is covered with a flap with velcro since the zipper lost that much going up to the head.  If you have any great ideas on how to finish the front and still make this an easy to use cover let me know.  I decided to make this because when cruising it was just too much hassle putting on the sail cover after sailing all day.
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MattGrant View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MattGrant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2005 at 10:58pm
On the Sailrite home page under the "Information" link you will find a link to "Instructions". Search down the list to find a beta version of Stackpack instructions. Thanks, Matt
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ernst Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2005 at 3:49pm
Originally posted by MattGrant MattGrant wrote:

On the Sailrite home page under the "Information" link you will find a link to "Instructions". Search down the list to find a beta version of Stackpack instructions. Thanks, Matt


Wow, that's timely. I am just getting interested in building my own stackpack. Thanks for the beta version!

However, one thing seems unnecessarily complicated, and that is the installation of the rails on the boom. Requires drilling umpteen holes into the boom, special screws etc.

What's wrong with just 'wrapping' the underside of the stackpack around the boom, thus enclosing the whole boom?The pack will then be held from falling down by the lazy jacks.

Of course, it would require providing for some openings in the cover, where the mainsheet attaches, if there are cleats on the boom etc but it still seems less intrusive and complex than the rail thing.

Comments?
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MattGrant View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MattGrant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2005 at 8:17pm

I am sure that your approach is possible but there will be numerous problems to work out. Here is my preliminary list of concerns:

1. Chafe at cleats, block, etc. Movement of the Sunbrella around these area.

2. Effort to reinforce and cut and trim holes. Also this will make installation / removal difficult.

3. Will there be enough support of the fabric along the bottom side of the boom. The lazy jacks can only do so much to hold everything up.

4. What happens when sailing? The fabric side will become loose. Will they then interfere with rigging?

In general my gut says this one is difficult to achieve successfully. If you decide to try please let me know how it works.

Best Regards, Matt Grant
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MattGrant View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MattGrant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2005 at 8:24pm

I just got done emailing another customer about the stackpack concept and they wanted to know if the cover could be attached to the normal boom slot. The answer is, if your mainsail is loose footed or if the sail uses slugs on the foot edge, this approach works very well. If the sail is loose footed, use a boltrope at the bottom edge of the stackpack cover and run it into the boom slot. If the sail uses slugs then you can stager slugs between those attached to the sail. These new slugs are grommeted to the stackpack cover. Installation and removal of the sail and stackpak combination is a bit difficult but fortunately is done infrequently.

Thanks, Matt
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Ernst View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ernst Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2005 at 11:26am
Matt,

always a pleasure to get your advice!All good points; comments below.

[QUOTE=MattGrant]

I am sure that your approach is possible but there will be numerous problems to work out. Here is my preliminary list of concerns:


1. Chafe at cleats, block, etc. Movement of the Sunbrella around these area.


2. Effort to reinforce and cut and trim holes. Also this will make installation / removaldifficult.


3. Will there be enough support of the fabric along the bottom side of the boom. The lazy jacks can only do so much to hold everything up.


4. What happens when sailing? The fabric side will become loose. Will they then interfere with rigging?


In general my gut says this one is difficult to achieve successfully. If you decide to try please let me know how it works.


Best Regards, Matt GrantSailrite


[/QUOTE
]

Chafe: Yes, I have thought of that but I think that can be managed with judicious application of reinforcements. In particular, given that this is a DIY project and that I don't have to call in the canvasmaker need I make to changes later.

Holes: Sure, it is extra work, but I offset that against the work of installing the rails, boltropes etc. And, for me importantly: I am not doing anything irreversible there, not drilling any holes into the boom that I might later regret etc.

Cover only held by lazy jacks; what happens while sailing? OK, that is a part I have not considered sufficiently. I will have to think that through a bit more.

Again, thanks again for your superfast reply, and I will monitor this forum for further ideas. (this will most likely be a winter project anyways).

--Ernst
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ernst Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2005 at 11:30am
Originally posted by MattGrant MattGrant wrote:

I just got done emailing another customer about the stackpack concept and they wanted to know if the cover could be attached to the normal boom slot. The answer is, if your mainsail is loose footed or if the sail uses slugs on the foot edge, this approach works very well. If the sail is loose footed, use a boltrope at the bottom edge of the stackpack cover and run it into the boom slot. If the sail uses slugs then you can stager slugs between those attached to the sail. These new slugs are grommeted to the stackpack cover. Installation and removal of the sail and stackpak combination is a bit difficult but fortunately is done infrequently.


Thanks, MattSailrite



I can confirm first-hand that this works very well. I came back this weekend from a Caribbean charter on a boat with a stackpack that was attached to the boom with a boltrope. The sail was loose-footed and everything worked like a charm.

Matt, your idea of alternating slugs is very interesting, I hadn't thought of that. Probably better than my original idea (see previous post). Have to mull that one a bit more.

--Ernst
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MattGrant View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MattGrant Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2005 at 10:48pm
Be sure to let me know how it goes! You are correct, the nice thing about DIY is no matter what you try (fail or not) you always learn something valuable in the process. Thanks, Matt
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Ernst View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ernst Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 July 2005 at 9:19pm
Originally posted by MattGrant MattGrant wrote:

Be sure to let me know how it goes! You are correct, the nice thing about DIY is no matter what you try (fail or not) you always learn something valuable in the process. Thanks, Matt


Will do. But don't hold your breath; I am still in the gathering-information-and-inspiration phase and it may well take until winter before I get serious. Summer is for sailing!

--Ernst
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